Meet Our Team

Myra Parker, JD, MPH, PhD

Myra Parker, JD, MPH, PhD

Executive Director

myrap@uw.edu

Myra Parker, JD, MPH, PhD, is an enrolled member of the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes and serves as an Associate Professor in the Center for the Study of Health and Risk Behavior in the University of Washington School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry. She is currently the Chief Executive Officer for Seven Directions, as well as an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington.

Full Bio

She also serves as Co-Director of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute’s Tribal Protocols and Ethics Division. She has worked for fourteen years on tribal public health program implementation, coordination, and research with tribal communities in Arizona, Idaho, and Washington.  Prior to her work in research, she worked for five years in the policy arena within Arizona state government, in tribal governments, and with tribal working groups at the state and national level. Her research experience in public health involves Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and disparities research. 

Dr. Parker serves as Co-Investigator on an ETHICS project to culturally adapt a human subjects curriculum for tribal communities; a national epidemiology research study grounded in CBPR involving twenty-five tribal colleges and universities to establish alcohol, tobacco, and drug use rates within their respective communities through a mixed methods approach; and, an NIAAA R01 research study investigating the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted version of the BASICS intervention and a policy intervention. 

As an enrolled member of the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes, Myra is aware of the historical health practices and misconduct perpetuated on tribes in the United States. Her background in law and policy has informed a broader understanding of the principles of ethics as well as honed her ability to identify methods to address the disparities in research control and access through the use of formalized agreements.

Christina E. Oré, MPH, DrPH

Christina E. Oré, MPH, DrPH

Public Health Practitioner

core1@uw.edu

Christina is dedicated to the community, inter-generational health and well-being that comes from a deep connection to place, people, and memory. Born and raised in Arizona, Christina has twenty years of experience as a public health practitioner working in research and practice for tribal nations, Indigenous communities, and regional/national tribal organizations, in the US and globally.

Full Bio

In 2019, Christina E. Oré joined our team from the Pascua Yaqui Tribe’s Health Services Division where she worked on tribal health systems strengthening initiatives: Indigenous centered, creative health assessments, inter governmental data linkages, tribal research ethics and review, and performance management systems development. She has an MPH in Community Health Practice and DrPH in public health policy and management from the University of Arizona (UA), Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. Christina completed an interdisciplinary minor with the Indigenous Peoples' Law and Policy program, UA Rogers College of Law, and Department of Sociology to strengthen her knowledge of political sovereignty and skills in social network analysis. Christina is a member of the US Indigenous Data Sovereignty Network, Research Data Alliance, and DrPH coalition. She was a founding member of the MEZCOPH American Indian Indigenous Health Alliance (AIIHA) and Red Star International, Inc. Christina is of Ayacuchano-Huancavelicana (Peru) and Irish (Arizona) descent. Her connection to this work is through the commitments she made to her family, communities, and the Yaqui Tribe in Sonora and Arizona.

Christina lives in Tucson, Arizona with her family, Joe, Munai and Tenzin, and extended family. She loves to walk in the desert, dip into ephemeral water, hike above timberline, dive into ocean waves, make pachamancas, and spend time with her family in Mexico, Peru, and the U.S.

Maya Magarati, PhD

Maya Magarati, PhD

Senior Advisor

magarati@uw.edu

In addition to her role as a senior advisor with Seven Directions, Maya is an affiliate faculty with the University of Washington department of Sociology and a research scientist with the UW Indigenous Wellness Research Institute.

Full Bio

Maya's scholarship intersects sociology, public health and geography in addressing social inequities with an intention of fostering knowledge democracy and holistic approaches to wellbeing. For almost a decade, she has collaborated on several NIH-, CDC- and tribally-funded research, evaluation and technical assistance projects with multi-disciplinary cross-institutional teams investigating resiliency, cultural strength and social determinants of behavioral health and non-communicable disease disparities in the American Indian and Alaska Native, immigrant and refugee communities in the US. 

Recently, Maya's research work has expanded into global arena looking at water insecurity and environmental health in Nepal. In between receiving a Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition from Australia, and Master (with Fulbright scholarship) and Ph.D in Sociology from the UW, she worked with a local NGO and with UNICEF in Nepal advancing community nutrition and health.  

Mays loves being outside hiking and backpacking on land. She is working on my swimming skills to be able to explore the myriads of bodies of water in the Puget Sound and beyond.

Danielle Eakins, PhD

Danielle Eakins, PhD

Research Scientist

deakins@uw.edu

Danielle Eakins is a licensed clinical psychologist and a research scientist at Seven Directions. She is dedicated to supporting behavioral wellness through collaborative, strengths-based partnerships with Indigenous communities.

Full Bio

Danielle is a mixed-race woman who had lived in eight states before entering high school. As such, her personal and professional interests have centered on the impact of community, belonging and identity on mental health. Danielle received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Washington. As a graduate student she interned for the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute and received a fellowship from the Indigenous Substance Abuse, Medicines and Addictions Research Training Program to complete her dissertation in conjunction with the Tribal College/University BeWell Study. Danielle completed her clinical psychology internship and post-doctoral fellowship as the Rural Health/Underserved Populations resident at the VA Pacific Islands Health Care System. At VA PIHCS, Danielle focused on in-person outreach and remote telehealth services to Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander veterans located in American Samoa, Guam, Saipan and the neighboring Hawaiian Islands.

Danielle is grateful to live in Hawaii and loves freediving and learning the environmentally sustainable practice of spearfishing.

Katie M. Hess, MPH

Katie M. Hess, MPH

Senior Research Coordinator

kathess@uw.edu

Katie M Hess (Native Hawaiian), MPH has spent the past nine years building and managing family support programs emphasizing early childhood and parent support at United Indians of All Tribes Foundation in Seattle, WA. Katie has a BA from UC, Berkeley and an MPH from the University of Washington.

Full Bio

Katie M Hess (Native Hawaiian), MPH has spent the past nine years building and managing family support programs emphasizing early childhood and parent support at United Indians of All Tribes Foundation in Seattle, WA. Katie has a BA from UC, Berkeley and an MPH from the University of Washington.

Leo Egashira, MBA

Leo Egashira, MBA

Research Coordinator

seattleo@uw.edu

Leo N. Egashira, MBA, is a Japanese-American born and raised in Seattle. He is a Research Coordinator at Seven Directions at the University of Washington and has been with the team since 2018. He also has been a Research Coordinator and Newsletter Editor at the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute since 2009, working primarily on research studies on Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Full Bio

He has been the project liaison with TCU partners and has visited communities to facilitate many on-site focus groups. Through these community visits, he has seen health disparities first-hand, which in turn has informed his passion to Indigenous Public Health.

Leo has a Bachelor’s degree in Japanese & Chinese languages, and a Master’s in Business Administration. He has studied linguistics and four foreign languages, and is a strong advocate for indigenous language retention and revitalization.

On a personal note, he is an outdoor nut, hiking and going on week-long backpacks to remote corners of North America, and snow-shoeing and cross-country skiing in winter locally. A non-car owner for 16 years, he bicycles Seattle’s hilly terrain daily in rain or shine.

Lynnette Jordan

Lynnette Jordan

Senior Research Coordinator

ljordanc@uw.edu

Lynnette Jordan is a citizen of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwa and a descendant of the Nespelem Band from the Colville Confederated Tribes. She has dedicated herself to advocating for urban Indian services for over 20 years in various capacities in Seattle, WA.

Full Bio

Most recently, she worked as the Operations Director at United Indians of All Tribes Foundation before leaving her position in August 2020 to work with Seven Directions. AT UIATF Lynnette worked in juvenile justice, family care support and nearly 13 years as the Indian Child Welfare Manager. Most recently she supported the development of childhood development programs with a newly revamped preschool and home visitation services. 

Lynnette received a BA in History and Indian Studies and her passion continues to be advocacy and support of Indian Country focusing on health and well being of children, youth, families and elders.

Sofia Singer

Sofia Singer

Research Coordinator

spsinger@uw.edu

Sofia Poggioni Singer is an Italian-American from Bronx, NY and a Research Coordinator at Seven Directions. She is committed to addressing public health challenges affecting vulnerable communities and is interested in how history, power, and norms influence behavior and the experience and effectiveness of health interventions.

Full Bio

As an undergraduate, Sofia worked on strengthening the emergency medical care system for indigenous families in Paraguay, decreasing the incidence rates of HIV/AIDS in Tanzania, and on neonatal health and violence against women initiatives in India. Most recently, she has been involved in the implementation of a program addressing intergenerational trauma and child mental health among Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

Sofia received a Bachelor’s degree from Stanford University in Anthropology, with a minor in Human Biology. She speaks Hindi and Italian, loves design thinking and improv, and enjoys coaching gymnastics to young girls.

Carly Marshall, MPA

Carly Marshall, MPA

Research Coordinator

carlym3@uw.edu

Carly (she/her) is a descendant of the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe. She received her MPA from the UW Evans School, focusing on environmental policy.

Full Bio

With a background in forestry science, she has done research on old growth trees and has worked in natural resource policy. She is invested in environmental justice and LGBTQ+ advocacy, and is very excited to be a part of the Seven Directions team.

Jacob Fong-Gurzinsky, MS

Jacob Fong-Gurzinsky, MS

Research Coordinator

jefg@uw.edu

Jacob received an MS degree in the UW School of Public Health's Epidemiology Department. He is interested in research on the social determinants of health, as well as the human gut microbiome.

Full Bio

He has done research in evolutionary biology and public health. He is excited to be working with Seven Directions and increasing his skillset.